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SF Trash Can Contest: Second Most Expensive Model Wins

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        The city’s Department of Public Works announced today that the “Slim Silhouette” model will be the new public trash can. The silver gray trash can is made from stainless steel pipe with a rounded top designed to prevent graffiti and debris from accumulating on the bucket.
        It emerged from six designs tested and discussed last summer. Three prototypes, including the “Slim Silhouette”, were criticized by the public for their high prices, with the “slim” prototype selling for around $18,800, which was definitely too expensive. But city officials say the trash cans will be more cost-effective when mass-produced with some design changes. For some reason, the price is now estimated at 2000-3000 dollars per can.
        Of the running cans, only the $20,900 Soft Square model is more expensive. The most economical outlet is Wire Mesh for $630.
        The new “slim” jar has a separate bottle and opening for easy storage and collection, so it is tamper-proof. It also contains a sensor that beeps when approaching the waste container.
        After summer testing in 52 urban areas, feedback was collected from the public, graffiti removal and maintenance crews, and Recology workers emptying cans. In total, Public Works received 1,000 online surveys and numerous discussions at in-person public events.
        “Slim silhouette” was the most acceptable design for the public, according to Mission Local’s analysis of 800 polls taken through August 22. More than 60% of people voted “Like” and “Doesn’t matter”.
        Note. This chart reflects the results of the survey as of August 22, 80% returned. It does not include responses without selected options. Reviews for other designs are available here. Graphics designed by Will Jarrett.
       While people love the overall look and structure, the biggest problem is the small opening and debris buildup on the outside of the tank.
        This is an ominous sign, because one of the main hopes for the “thin” can is to reduce the amount of garbage on the streets. The city’s now maligned renaissance trash cans are easy targets for scavengers who rummage through them and leave a mess behind.
       Public Works has stated that some adjustments will be made during the production of the Slim Silhouette, including hole size, exchange can information, and specific locking mechanisms.
       The next steps are to identify sources of funding and obtain all necessary approvals, such as the Municipal Project Review Board and the Historic Preservation Board.
        Data Journalist Intern. Chuqing holds two degrees in data journalism and is passionate about making data more accessible to readers. Prior to joining the Mission, she covered small business and migratory birds in New York City while studying programming and design at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. She loves coastal cities, including SF Express and her hometown of Ningbo.
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        What a lot of people don’t realize is that having a public trash can is a PITA in many areas of San Francisco due to the demographics: too many drug addicts, the mentally unstable, the retarded, etc. We always have a trash can in the bottom corner. Nob Hill is a mess every other day. Now, after widening the sidewalk for the municipality, DPW has put the Slim model on the corner. The garbage accumulated next to the tanks did not decrease at all. Some really crazy people take all the bags of shit out of the container. Why? ? ? This is the main reason why garbage cans are removed from the streets. There are no trash cans on the streets of Tokyo and trash can be found everywhere. Well, they keep those who can’t be held accountable indoors. Not so long ago, we were talking to immigrants from the Yucatan Peninsula. They couldn’t believe how dirty San Francisco was compared to Merida.
        We still have 30 percent fewer litter boxes and have cleared thousands than before Newsom became mayor. The number of trash cans and the frequency of maintenance are two factors that affect waste disposal.
        I usually go cheap, but barbed wire is too easy for crazy treasure hunters. I’m shocked they made the right decision as it will minimize diving into dumpsters and won’t look like crap. People will find a way to celebrate it, but you can’t avoid this part. Let’s see how many “garbage fill metrics” are violated during the year as it seems inevitable…
        If you sort the list by a combination of “good” and “liked”, wire mesh comes in second at 1/30th of the price. Our lives would be so much better if the DPW could hold enough trash and pick up the trash from the bins instead of letting them overflow. DPW’s suggestion that spending more money on the bin will solve the trash problem is laughable, and worse, someone will fall for it. SF City: The Fool and his money soon sold out.
        Typical science fiction. Wire mesh trash can be worth roughly 1/5th the cost of this Gilded Age toy, and it showed exactly the same results in the “never mind” answer. What else can you ask of a trash can, other than “everything is in order”?
        The type of trash can doesn’t matter if a) there are too few trash cans right now b) if no one picks up trash in and around the trash cans like they do now / or don’t. Instead of focusing on design, focus on DPW’s contract with Recology. How much do cities pay companies for their work? The city is a dumping ground that pays a private monopoly to do the job. does it matter?
        Mission Local produces corporate reports on San Francisco’s most important issues: police reform, corruption, health care, housing, and homelessness. Find out more about us.
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Post time: Jan-14-2023